Getting Approved For a Mortgage: Here’s What You Need

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The desire to own a home is relatively universal, and once you decide it’s time to start looking at homes, a whole plethora of tasks begin to unfold in front of you. The average individual does not have hundreds of thousands of dollars of cash on hand, so the greatest task to tackle is getting approved for a mortgage. While lending companies may be willing to extend credit under certain circumstances, the reality of the situation is that the standards for being approved (quickly) for a mortgage are very high. There are a few things that you will need (and need to be aware of) when applying for a mortgage:

 

Strong & Lengthy Employment History

Lenders feel safer with lending when your recent employment history touts at least a 2 year stint at your most recent place of employment. The longer you’ve been working (and the smaller number of job hops that you have on your resume), the more trustworthy you become to banks.

 

Excellent Credit & Your Credit Reports

This is a bit of a no brainer; your credit score is one of the most important factor when it comes to being approved for a mortgage.  Your FICO score can be in the 620-640 range to be approved for some loan programs, however a  credit score of 720 or higher will lend itself to getting much better interest rates, which can equate to thousands of dollars saved over your lifetime.

 

Make sure to review all three of your credit reports before diving into the mortgage application process. An estimated 40% of credit reports contain errors that could be directly affecting your credit score. Make sure to get all discrepancies fixed as soon as possible.

Money Down & Cash on Hand

It is virtually impossible to get a loan without putting money down. The general rule is to be prepared to put down a minimum of 20% of the mortgage up front. It’s also important to remember that banks and lenders will also be checking your cash on hand. Lenders are weary of mortgage applicants that don’t have a significant enough savings; if a single emergency could clean out your savings, it is unlikely that you will get a mortgage.

 

Misc Important Documents:

  • Records of your employment history for at least 2 years
  • Records of your residence for at least 2 years
  • Proof of Homeowner’s Insurance
  • Pay Stubs from the last 2 months of employment

 

For references and additional resources, please see the following articles: 123

 

Tips to Prevent Bankruptcy – Part 1

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Some individuals’ personal finances become so overwhelming that they look to bankruptcy as a quick fix. But the reality is that bankruptcy should be an absolute last resort. Filing for bankruptcy leaves the filer with an abysmal credit rating, which will make borrowing money virtually impossible for at least a decade. Those who file for bankruptcy are also subject to mandatory credit counseling, and are likely to be forced to make continuous and ongoing payments to various creditors.

There are a few situations where bankruptcy is virtually unavoidable. A long period of unexpected unemployment or a severe medical emergency can quickly clean out a savings account and leave few viable options for financial survival. However, most cases of bankruptcy are caused by unsustainable spending habits and a lack of savings. The majority of those cases can be avoided with just a few lifestyle adjustments.

 

Reduction of Spending

The easiest way to start cutting what you spend is to first determine where your money actually goes. Create a budget using an online service like Mint.com to really get a handle on exactly what your spending is each month.  Once you see exactly how you are spending your money, you can find areas where spending can be reduced.

 

Start by destroying credit cards, and using cash to make purchases. This will make your spending feel more “real”. If cash only is impossible, then your next step may be to downsize your current living expenses.  The goal of all of the reduction is to live within your means. If that means moving into a less expensive home or buying used cars instead of new cars, then those are measures that should be taken.

 

Contact Creditors/Lenders/Service Providers Before Payments Are Late

If you are already making the minimum payments on your bills, but are still struggling to keep up with the payments, contact the lenders. It’s important to determine if a late payment  could be made without penalty or if the bill’s deadline could be extended.

 

If you are working with a large amount of credit card debt, and seriously considering filing for bankruptcy because of it, speak to the creditors about your options. A lower interest rate or repayment plan may be available. Creditors do not want to lose all of the money that was loaned out, so they will be more inclined to work out a scenario where your payments are more manageable.

There is still much more to learn. Be sure to check back next month for more tips to Prevent Bankruptcy.

For resources and more information, see these two sites: here & here