Foreclosure Start Rates Lowest in 16 Years

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According to the Mortgage Bankers Association’s National Delinquency Survey, foreclosure starts have decreased across the board, in the first quarter of 2016.

The Mortgage Bankers Association (MBA) is one of the most reputable and highly recognized sources for data on the residential delinquency and foreclosure rates. For their National Delinquency Survey, 120 mortgage lenders are observed. They sample 41.6 million mortgage loans that are given out by institutions such as banks, credit unions, and mortgage companies. The MBA then proceeds to review and report on both the delinquency rates and foreclosure rates that they observe throughout the sampling.

One of the most significant rates to decrease was the percentage of loans where the action to foreclose was started. In the first quarter of 2016, the rate is 35%, which is down 10 points from 2015 and is the lowest level since the second quarter of 2000. (source)

This downturn in foreclosure can be attributed to two major shifts. One, the qualifications and guidelines for getting a mortgage loan have become much more stringent since the recession of 2008. The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act was put into place under Obama’s presidency; it was a huge reform that was designed to temper and prevent risky business practices by a variety of financial institutions. Under the Dodd-Frank Act, The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau was established to provide regulation over mortgage lenders and brokers.  One of the major side effects of that act was the implementation of protections of families from exploitive measures by lenders and mortgage companies.

The second shift took place on the consumer end. After feeling the effects of recession, consumers looking to buy a home have begun to seek education on the real estate market, before reaching out to apply for the loan.  More resources have become available on predatory lending, and consumers are now willing and able to arm themselves with that knowledge before moving forward.

As the decrease in foreclosure starts continues, the whole lending market will begin to shift focus. The focus for the past few years has perpetually been stuck on reducing risk. But with the reduction of foreclosures now being evident, lenders will be able to start focusing on expanding access to credit. Their goal can now be on continuing this positive momentum, and creating traction for a new housing boom.


For resources, please visit the following sources: MBA.org, Cornerstone Mortgage, Mortgage Orb