What to Consider Before Buying Your First Home – Part 2

home and vintage car

In my last post, I started a list of things that you should absolutely consider before purchasing your first home. Buying a home is a major live achievement, and you’ll want to make sure that everything goes as smoothly as possible, so your achievement doesn’t turn into a source of deep personal and financial strife.

Let’s delve a little further into some other important things to think about before you sign on the dotted line.

 

Don’t Buy A Home for the View

If you’re looking at a home, and the selling point is the view, you must remind yourself that that view may not be there forever. Markets shift, renovations happen, and new properties are built all of the time; those can easily obstruct or destroy the view that you loved so much.

Protip: If you really love the view, and you have the means…..try and buy the property that makes it up. This is really only applicable in rural, undeveloped areas, but it may be possible to purchase a small plot of the land that makes up the view that you love.

 

What Is The Long Term Plan?

There are a few things to consider when you’re thinking long term.

  1. The most obvious question is whether or not you are planning to grow your family. How many kids are you planning for? Will there be enough space? Is the layout of the house kid-friendly/safe?
  2. If this is just a “starter” house, and you’re planning to move and rent out this house: Make sure renting is allowed. There are some homeowner associations that contractually prohibit renting, so be aware of that before you buy.
  3. If this is just a “starter” house, and you’re planning on selling, determine who the house will appeal to when you’re trying to sell. Is this home going to appeal only to first time buyers or will families consider it too?

You’ll want to try to invest in a home that appeals to a broad market. So, consider things like school districts, proximity to amenities, & family-friendliness when purchasing because you don’t want to end up with a house that you can’t sell or lose money on because your potential buyer-pool is limited.