Tips on How to Boost Your Credit Score

credit score

Your credit score is like a report card on how you manage your finances, and just as it is important to have A’s and B’s on your report card, it’s important to have a good credit score. Not only can your score play a role in whether you can get a loan, it also may affect what you pay for insurance and the amount of deposit you have to put down on an apartment. If your credit score is lower than it should be, you can follow these tips to give it a boost.

Bring past-due accounts current

One of the best and easiest ways to boost your credit score is to get current on any past-due accounts. If you are applying for a mortgage to check with the mortgage company first before paying any collections or charge offs. These accounts may not need to be paid before the loan is done and paying off old collections or charge offs will bring your scores down temporarily, or until they show some history of being paid and could cause a problem with getting the loan.

Accounts that haven’t been paid on time can greatly reduce your credit score, because your payment history accounts for more than one-third of your total score. If you have any accounts that are in collections, pay those off first and make sure the collections agency notifies that credit bureaus that you are now current. Then concentrate on bringing other accounts up to current status. One key thing to focus on, however, is that you want to make sure you don’t let any new accounts become past due while you are catching up on accounts that are already behind.

Pay down debt

Once you have worked to get all your credit accounts current, your next focus should be on paying down debt. The amount you owe makes up 30 percent of your credit score, and if you owe a lot relative to how much credit you have available, then it will affect your score. A general rule of thumb is your debt should be less than 30 percent of the amount of credit you have available. So if you have $10,000 worth of available credit, you should owe less than $3,000. This rule applies only to revolving credit accounts like credit cards, not to installment loans such as a car loan.

Don’t close accounts

If you pay off an account, you may be tempted to close it, but that can hurt your score, especially if the account has been open for a long time. The length of your credit history accounts for 15 percent of your credit score, so if you cancel accounts you have had for a long time, it can shorten your history and hurt your score. Keeping accounts open, even after they are paid off, will help boost your score.

Don’t open new accounts

The more credit cards you have, the more it can lower your score, especially if you have opened a lot of accounts recently. Opening a lot of accounts in a short time looks risky to lenders and can hurt your score. Doing so also can shorten your credit history, which can reduce your score as well.